11.11.18

Over Summer I was privileged to be near enough to Dryburgh Abbey for work and was able to call in the see the family plot of Field Marshall Douglas Haig. It contains the graves of Haig and his wife Dorothy. As he was the architect of British victory in the First World War it seems right that he should be honoured on the 100th anniversary of the Armistice. Here are my photos of his family plot.

Douglas Haig's grave at Dryburgh Abbey
Douglas Haig's grave at Dryburgh Abbey
Douglas and Dorothy Haig's grave at Dryburgh Abbey
The cross of sacrifice near Douglas and Dorothy Haig's grave at Dryburgh Abbey

Today I shall be remembering the three unknown German soldiers recovered at Bullecourt in 2017 and 2018

Two German soldiers recovered at Bullecourt in 2017, photo copyright Harvey Mills
A German soldier recovered at Bullecourt in 2018, photo copyright Harvey Mills
Facial reconstruction of a German soldier recovered at Bullecourt in 2018, photo copyright Harvey Mills/Facelab

Jakob Hönes, Alfred Thielicke and the unknown British soldier of the King's Owen Liverpool Regiment, recovered at Serre in 2003
Alfred Thielecke, an NCO of 7 Kompanie, 121 RIR found at Serre 2003
Jakob Hönes of 9th Kompanie II/121 RIR recovered at Serre in 2003
Jakob Hönes of 9th Kompanie II/121 RIR recovered at Serre in 2003

Gefreiter Leopold Rothärmel and several other German soldiers and one Scottish soldier recovered at Loos in 2005

Remains of several men recovered at Loos in 2005

I was honoured to be involved with their recovery. 

We will remember them.

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